A criminal record certificate shows whether you have broken any laws
relevant to the field in which you will be working or studying. Your employer, organisation or place of study can ask for a police record certificate to check whether you are a suitable person for the job or course of study concerned.

You must show your criminal record certificate to the organisation that requested it no more than 3 months after the date on which it was issued.

As long as you have the same job or position of trust, or remain a student on the same course, your employer, organisation or place of study cannot require you to show them a new criminal record certificate. They may request a new criminal record certificate only if you are going to take up a new position or you have been away from your job/position for a while and are now returning to it.

A criminal record certificate shows what has been recorded about you in police registers.

An ordinary criminal record certificate lists any criminal convictions and related sentences you have received within a given period of time.

The criminal record certificate shows:

  • If you have been sentenced to prison for a period of six months or less and the sentence was handed down three years or less before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been sentenced to prison for a period of more than six months and you were released less than ten years before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been given a suspended prison sentence and the sentence was handed down three years or less before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been sentenced to indefinite or preventive detention and you were released from prison less than ten years before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been given a community sentence or sentenced to community service, where the underlying prison sentence was six months or less in duration and the sentence was handed down three years or less before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been given a community sentence or sentenced to community service, where the underlying prison sentence was more than six months and the community sentence was completed less than ten years before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been given a youth sentence and the sentence was handed down three years or less before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been given a fine for a criminal offence carrying a maximum prison sentence of more than six months. This information will remain on your record for three years from the date on which you accepted the fine.
  • If you have been committed to compulsory psychiatric care, compulsory care or preventive detention and the committal period came to an end less than ten years before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been sentenced to a loss of rights for a fixed period of time and the sentence came to an end less than ten years before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have been sentenced to a permanent loss of rights. This information will always be shown.

The criminal record certificate does not show:

  • If you have been given a suspended prison sentence and the sentence is not yet legally enforceable (in other words, it may still be appealed).
  • If you have been given a fine for a criminal offence carrying a maximum prison sentence of six months or less.
  • If you have been given a fixed penalty notice.
  • If the prosecution authorities have decided not to prosecute you (waived prosecution in your case).
  • If a case in which you are involved is transferred to the Norwegian Mediation Service for resolution.
  • If you have been transferred into the care of the child welfare authorities.
  • If you have had your driving licence confiscated, for example.
  • The results of any court-ordered psychiatric assessment or social inquiry report.

If you have repeatedly been found guilty of serious criminal offences for which you have been sentenced to:

  • imprisonment for terms of six months or more
  • preventive detentionin
  • definite detention
  • committal to compulsory psychiatric care or compulsory care

all your convictions will be included in the criminal record certificate, even if only one of them must be included under the ten-year disclosure rule. This rule normally excludes convictions handed down more than ten years before.
Loss of rights includes, for example, a ban on being employed in a certain kind of job or engaging in a certain kind of business or activity. It may also include a ban on contacting one or more specific people.

Two exceptions for young offenders

Did you commit a criminal offence before your 18th birthday? The following will not be included in the criminal record certificate:

  • If you have been given a suspended prison sentence or fine and the criminal offence took place more than two years before the certificate was issued.
  • If you have given a community sentence, where the underlying sentence is more than six months in prison or a youth sentence and the offence took place more than five years before the certificate was issued.

An exhaustive criminal record certificate shows everything that has been recorded about you in police registers.

Exceptions:

  • If a case has been transferred to the Norwegian Mediation Service for resolution, it will not be included in an exhaustive criminal record certificate if you have not committed any new criminal offence for which a prison sentence can be given in the two years after an approved agreement, youth plan or plan was entered into as part of the Mediation Service's proceedings.
  • If you have been given and accepted a fixed penalty notice.

Exceptions for offenders under the age of 18

An exhaustive criminal record certificate for offenders under the age of 18 must be issued in accordance with the regulations for an ordinary criminal record certificate.

However, if one of the conditions set out below are met, the penalty must be included in accordance with the regulations for an exhaustive criminal record certificate:

  • 1 offence carrying a maximum sentence of more than three years in prison.
  • 3 or more offences carrying a maximum sentence of more than one year in prison.
  • 5 or more offences for which a prison sentence may be given, regardless of the maximum term.
  • any new offences committed after the age of 18 but within the deadlines set in the original sentence must be shown in an ordinary criminal record certificate.

Does one or more of these points apply to you? In that case, the rules governing the information to be included in the exhaustive criminal record certificate apply.

An expanded criminal record certificate shows details of criminal cases that have not yet been finally decided by the police or the courts. This means that the certificate will contain details of criminal charges, indictments and penalty notices, as well as convictions that are still under appeal.

Allegations of criminal activity reported to the police and cases that the police have decided not to investigate are not included in a criminal record certificate.

A restricted criminal record certificate includes only certain types of criminal offences. It is the certificate's purpose and the legal authority on which it rests that decides what types of offences may be shown.

A restricted criminal record certificate may be both exhaustive and expanded, or it can be ordinary – or a combination of all three.